Science Daily

Information on Parkinson's disease. Learn about Parkinson's disease treatments, symptoms, new research and medication.
  1. A genetic 'switch' has been discovered, which could help to prevent or delay the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, report scientists.
  2. New research results are expanding our understanding of the physiological role of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor GDNF in the function of the brain's dopamine systems. In a new article, researchers establish that GDNF is an important physiological regulator of the functioning of the brain’s dopamine neurons.
  3. Neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's may be linked to defective brain cells disposing toxic proteins that make neighboring cells sick, say researchers. These findings could have major implications for neurological disease in humans and possibly be the way that disease can spread in the brain.
  4. A team of researchers has identified an underlying mechanism in early onset Parkinson’s. Using flies, mice and patient cells, the team focused on cardiolipin, a fat unique to cells’ mitochondria, organelles that produce energy. They demonstrated that reducing the effects of the protein FASN influences the mitochondria, leading to increased cardiolipin levels and reduced Parkinson’s symptoms. These results could pave the way to therapies for Parkinson’s disease that target lipids.
  5. A simple blood test may be as accurate as a spinal fluid test when trying to determine whether symptoms are caused by Parkinson's disease or another atypical parkinsonism disorder, according to a new study.
  6. Researchers report they have discovered how two problem proteins known to cause Parkinson's disease are chemically linked, suggesting that someday, both could be neutralized by a single drug designed to target the link.
  7. A basic hand-grip test has proven to be a reliable tool to monitor the decline of patients with Parkinson's diseases, say investigators.
  8. In order to drive a car, you need a good balance between accelerator and brake. The same applies to a part of the brain -- the striatum - that controls our movements. Research has led to new findings on the interaction between the "accelerator" and the "brake" in the striatum. These findings may guide the development of treatments for movement disorders such as those occurring in Parkinson's disease.
  9. New techniques map alpha-syuclein toxicity, spatial location, and links to Parkinson's genes, report investigators in a new article.
  10. A fault with the natural waste disposal system that helps to keep our brain cell 'batteries' healthy may contribute to neurodegenerative disease, a new study has found.